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Dietitian vs. Nutritionist: What’s the Difference?

18 Jun

I have been MIA from blogging because I have been completing a dietetic internship. This internship is one distinguishing feature between a Registered Dietitian and a Nutritionist. These terms are often used interchangeably and incorrectly. The purpose of this post is to clarify the differences.

Registered Dietitian

  • Undergraduate degree usually in nutrition
    • Many also have masters degrees
  • Completion of an internship
    • 1200 hours of supervised practice
  • Must pass national registry exam
    • Maintain registered status with continued education throughout career
  • National standards for professional legislation
    • The title of dietitian is protected by law
  • Experts in food and nutrition
  • Credentials RD (Registered Dietitian) or RDN (Registered Dietitian Nutritionist)

Nutritionist

  • Undergraduate and/or graduate degree in nutrition
    • Some do not have degrees
  • In most states anyone can all themselves a nutritionist regardless of education and training
    • States with licensing requirements- Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, and Maine.
  • Non-accredited title; not protected by law

When you need nutrition or nutrition related health information seek a registered dietitian, because they are experts in their field and they have completed the necessary education and training. If you are going to work with a nutritionist do your research to be sure they are a reliable source of information.

I have a few months left in my internship and I am excited to get my credentials and begin my career as a registered dietitian. I am also excited that I will have more time to blog, as I have many topics I want to discuss and recipes to make and share.

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Banana Walnut Chocolate Chunk Cookies

26 Dec

I was looking for a new cookie recipe and found this one from Martha Stewart. They are easy to make and taste like banana bread!


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Ingredients

  • 1 cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 cup Whole-Wheat Flour
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 sticks Unsalted Butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1/2 cup Light-Brown Sugar, packed
  • 1 Large Egg
  • 1 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1/2 cup Ripe Banana, mashed (about 1 large)
  • 1 cup Old-Fashioned Rolled Oats
  • 8 ounces Semisweet Chocolate, chopped into 1/4-inch chunks
  • 1/2 cup Walnuts, chopped

Method

1. Chop chocolate and mash banana.

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2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Whisk together flours, salt, and baking soda in a small bowl; set aside. Put butter and sugars into the bowl and cream until pale and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; mix until combined. Mix in banana. Add flour mixture; mix until just combined. Stir in oats, chocolate chunks, and walnuts.

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3. Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop, drop dough onto baking sheets lined with parchment paper, spacing about 2 inches apart. Bake cookies, rotating sheets halfway through, until golden brown and just set, 12 to 13 minutes.

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Enjoy with a glass of milk!

Seasonal Eating

16 Oct

In recent years there has been more emphasis on eating locally grown produce and the concept of farm to table eating. A central idea within these concepts is seasonal eating. Seasonal eating is eating foods that are in season, harvested at their peak.

When you eat foods that are currently in season you get more nutrients compared to eating foods that are out of season. This is because the foods are picked when they are at their peak.  Foods that are made available in their off season have less nutritional value because they are picked before they ripen so they can be shipped without spoiling. Eating foods at their peak also means more flavor! Seasonal eating also impacts the environment. Shipping foods long distances creates more fuel emissions. Food that is grown locally or regionally does not have to travel as far to get to you, with fewer emissions. Finally each season brings different fruits and vegetables to choose from adding variety to your diet.

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What is in season for fall?

Apples Artichoke
Asian Pear Asparagus
Avocado Beets
Broccoli Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage Carrots
Cauliflower Celery
Chard Cherimoyas
Collards Corn
Cucumber Dates
Eggplant Figs
Grapes Grapefruit
Green Beans Ginger
Guava Kale
Kiwi Kohlrabi
Leeks Lemons
Mushrooms Mustard Greens
Okra Onions
Ranges Passion Fruit
Peppers Persimmons
Pineapple Pomegranates
Potatoes Raspberries
Sapote Spinach
Squash-Summer and Winter varieties Tomatillos
Turnips Yams

Sweet Tooth

13 Aug

Months ago I came across a recipe for Lemon Ginger Crispy Treats. Lately I have been craving sweets and finally made them, with a few modifications.

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Ingredients

1-1/2 tablespoons Fresh Lemon Zest

1/3 cup Candied Ginger, chopped

4 tablespoons Unsalted Butter

3/4 cup Agave Syrup

7 cups Puffed Rice Cereal

8 oz Dark Baking Chocolate

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20130806-145748.jpg1. Zest lemon and chop ginger. Set ginger aside.

20130806-150020.jpg2. Melt butter and add agave syrup, lemon zest, and puffed rice cereal. Mix until cereal is well coated.

20130806-150804.jpg3. Pack cereal mixture in a greased 9 x 13 pan, Because agave syrup is not as sticky as marshmallows you need to really pack the cereal mixture in to the pan. I laid a sheet of parchment paper over cereal mixture and pressed it as tightly as possible. This will ensure your crispy treats stay together and won’t fall apart on you.

20130806-150917.jpg4. Melt chocolate and evenly spread over packed cereal mixture.

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5. Sprinkle chopped ginger over the top and place in the refrigerator to set.

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6. Run a spatula or knife around the edges of pan and cut in to squares.

Chocolate Fix

15 May

These cookies are perfect for when you want something chocolaty with out going overboard on fat and sugar. They are quick and easy to make and their nutritional value is better than many store bought brands.

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Yield about 18 cookies

Ingredients
2/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 cup good quality unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup oats
1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips

Method
1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
2. Combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt in a small bowl. Put the butter and sugar in a separate bowl and use a wooden spoon to cream them together until light and slightly fluffy; add the vanilla and continue mixing until it’s well combined.
3. Add the flour mixture to the butter and sugar; at this point the batter will become quite firm. Add the oats and mix them in evenly, then add the chocolate chips. You may have to knead the dough by hand at this point to fully integrate the oats and chips.
4. Using a tablespoon, scoop up balls of dough and put them on the prepared cookie sheet about two inches apart. Once you’ve filled the sheet, flatten each ball slightly with the back of a spoon or the flat side of a measuring cup; you may need to moisten the spoon or cup to keep the dough from sticking.
5. Bake the cookies until the top is set and cracked, about 14 minutes. Set on a rack to cool and serve.

Serving                                1 Cookie
Calories                               107
Total fat                               6 gm
Saturated Fat                     3 gm
Sodium                                 33 gm
Total Carbohydrate        12 gm
Dietary Fiber                     0.4 gm
Sugar                                    8 gm
Protein                                1 gm

Recipe has been adapted from one featured in the NY Times