Serving Size…What’s That?

6 Feb

The information is out there to get 3 servings of dairy/day, 6-11 servings of grains,  to eat 5 day, or to fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. What does all this mean? What constitutes a serving?

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Fruit: 2 servings/day (generally)

1 serving=1 cup of fresh, frozen, or canned, 1/2 cup dried, or 1 cup of 100% juice.

Fruits provide folate, vitamins A and C, potassium, and fiber.

Examples: Apple, apricot, avocado, banana, blueberries, cherries, grapefruit, grapes, honeydew, kiwi, mango, nectarine, orange, papaya, peach, pear, pineapple, plumb, raspberries, strawberries, tangerine, and watermelon.

Vegetables: 3-5 servings/day

1 serving= 1 cup raw or cooked, 1 cup 100% juice, 1 cup cooked legumes, or 2 cups raw, leafy greens

Vegetables provide folate, vitamins A, C, K, and E, magnesium , potassium, and fiber.

Examples: artichoke, asparagus, legumes (black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, soy beans, white beans) beets, bell peppers, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cassava, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, green beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, squash,  zucchini, and leafy greens: kale, chard, arugula, spinach, romaine lettuce.

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Grains: 6-11 servings/day

1 serving=1 oz 1 slice of bread, 1/2 cup cooked rice, pasta, or cereal, 1 oz dry pasta or rice, 1 cup ready to eat cereal, or 3 c popped popcorn.

Grains provide folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, iron, magnesium, selenium, and fiber. Choose whole grains, which contain more nutrients, opposed to refined grains.

Examples: Amarath, barley, brown rice, buckwheat, bulgur, millet, oats, quinoa, rye, wheat, sweet potato, potato ,peas, and corn.

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Protein: 2-3 servings/day

1 serving= 3 oz lean meat, poultry, or seafood, 1 egg, 1/4 cup cooked legumes or tofu, 1 Tbs peanut butter, and 1/2 oz nuts or seeds.

Protein foods provides protein,  essential fatty acids, niacin, thiamin, vitamin B6 and B12, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc.

Examples: Seafood (tuna, halibut, salmon, mackerel, tilapia, shrimp, crab, lobster), lean meats (poultry, beef, lamb, pork), eggs, legumes (black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, soy beans, white beans), nuts/nut butters (almonds, cashews, walnuts, pistachios, peanuts), and seeds (flax, chia, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin).

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Dairy: 3 servings/day

1 serving=1 cup of milk, yogurt, fortified soy milk, and 1-1/2 oz natural cheese.

Dairy products contribute protein, riboflavin, vitamin B12, calcium, potassium, and when fortified vitamin A and D.

Examples: Milk, cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese, fortified soy, almond, or coconut milk.

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Oils: This is not a food group, however it is good to keep serving size in mind.

1 serving=1 teaspoon oil, 1 tablespoon low fat mayonnaise, or 2 tablespoons light salad dressing.

Oils contribute vitamin E and essential fatty acids.

Examples: Fatty fish, nuts, olives, seeds, canola, corn, flaxseed, olive, peanut, safflower, sesame, soy bean, sunflower, avocado, and coconut oils.

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Banana Walnut Chocolate Chunk Cookies

26 Dec

I was looking for a new cookie recipe and found this one from Martha Stewart. They are easy to make and taste like banana bread!


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Ingredients

  • 1 cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 cup Whole-Wheat Flour
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 1/2 sticks Unsalted Butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1/2 cup Light-Brown Sugar, packed
  • 1 Large Egg
  • 1 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1/2 cup Ripe Banana, mashed (about 1 large)
  • 1 cup Old-Fashioned Rolled Oats
  • 8 ounces Semisweet Chocolate, chopped into 1/4-inch chunks
  • 1/2 cup Walnuts, chopped

Method

1. Chop chocolate and mash banana.

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2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Whisk together flours, salt, and baking soda in a small bowl; set aside. Put butter and sugars into the bowl and cream until pale and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; mix until combined. Mix in banana. Add flour mixture; mix until just combined. Stir in oats, chocolate chunks, and walnuts.

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3. Using a 1 1/2-inch ice cream scoop, drop dough onto baking sheets lined with parchment paper, spacing about 2 inches apart. Bake cookies, rotating sheets halfway through, until golden brown and just set, 12 to 13 minutes.

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Enjoy with a glass of milk!

Black Lentil Soup

26 Nov

Compared to their traditional counterparts black lentils are tiny spherical black legumes also known as beluga lentils because they look like caviar. Due to their smaller size they cook quicker and make a great side dish, salad addition, or soup. I like this soup because the spices make it a warming dish, great for chilly winter weather.

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Ingredients

1 cup Black Lentils

1-1 inch piece of fresh Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced, plus 2 Tbs minced

3 Tbs Unsalted Butter

1 medium Onion, diced

2 cloves Garlic, minced

1/2 Tsp ground Coriander

1/2 Tsp ground Cumin

1/4 Tsp Cayenne Pepper

1/4 Tsp Gram Masala

2 quarts Low Sodium Chicken Stock

1 cup Crushed Tomatoes

Salt to taste

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Method

1. In a medium pot cover lentils and sliced ginger with 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil and cook over medium heat until lentils soften, about 10 minutes.

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2. Drain lentils and set aside, discard sliced ginger.

3. Melt 3 tablespoons of butter in the pot. Add onion, garlic, and minced ginger. Cook over medium heat until softened, about 8 minutes.

4. Reduce heat to low and add spices, cook stirring, until fragrant about 4 minutes.

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5. Add stock, tomatoes, and lentils bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer until lentils soften further and soup has thickened, about 1 hour. Season with salt portion in to bowls and serve.

 

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Considerations

  • Make this soup vegan buy using vegetable stock and olive oil or coconut oil instead of butter.
  • Top soup with avocado, which adds richness to the final product.
  • Add chopped kale or spinach just before serving.

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Yoga

12 Nov

Yoga is one of my favorite forms of exercise. It has many benefits and is a great compliment to strength and cardiovascular training. There are also many types of yoga, providing something for everyone.

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I have been practicing yoga for the past 8 years with power yoga being my method of choice. I love it because it engages your mind, body, and spirit and never fails to make me feel great or put me in a better mood. When practicing it is one of the only times I am able to fully clear my mind and let go of every thought.

Benefits of Yoga

  • Increased flexibility
  • Increased strength
  • Improved posture
  • Improved lung capacity
  • Stress reduction

Types of Yoga-these are just a few, there are many more

  • Hatha- The foundation of all yoga styles. It incorporates postures, breathing, and meditation.
  • Bikram- Practiced in a heated room, which promotes flexibility, detoxification, and the prevention of injuries.
  • Kundalini- Thought to be the yoga of awareness it focuses on the breath and movement to awaken the energy at the base of the spine to travel up through the 7 chakras.
  • Power- A faster paced practice where one pose flows in to the next, creating an aerobic workout.
  • Restorative- A method to passively let muscles relax buy using/lying on blocks, blankets, and bolsters

As with all activities there is the risk of injury when practicing yoga. It is important to listen to your body and know your own limitations to prevent injury when doing physical activity. In yoga there is the potential to over stretch or strain muscles.  Also if you have a preexisting condition such as severe osteoporosis or are pregnant consulting your doctor before beginning a yoga practice is advised.

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NAMASTE

Winter Hydration

30 Oct

During fall and winter we do not have as many cues for hydration. When the temperature drops we do not sweat as much or feel thirsty as often compared to when it is warm. We also lose more water due to respiratory fluid loss through breathing. When exercising our bodies are working hard and sweat evaporates quickly in cold dry air. All of these factors make it easy for someone to become dehydrated.

Deniz-water-hydration-tips

Tips for staying hydrated this winter:

  • Carry a refillable water bottle with you
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol-which act as diuretics
  • Drink warm beverages-warm lemon water or herbal tea will also help keep you warm
  • Drink water before, during, and after exercise-dehydration can negatively effect performance
    • Depending on the activity have a sports drink to replace electrolytes
  • Monitor the quantity and color of you urine
  • Good fluid sources include water, sports drinks, soups, fruits and vegetables (whole or juiced)

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Seasonal Eating

16 Oct

In recent years there has been more emphasis on eating locally grown produce and the concept of farm to table eating. A central idea within these concepts is seasonal eating. Seasonal eating is eating foods that are in season, harvested at their peak.

When you eat foods that are currently in season you get more nutrients compared to eating foods that are out of season. This is because the foods are picked when they are at their peak.  Foods that are made available in their off season have less nutritional value because they are picked before they ripen so they can be shipped without spoiling. Eating foods at their peak also means more flavor! Seasonal eating also impacts the environment. Shipping foods long distances creates more fuel emissions. Food that is grown locally or regionally does not have to travel as far to get to you, with fewer emissions. Finally each season brings different fruits and vegetables to choose from adding variety to your diet.

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What is in season for fall?

Apples Artichoke
Asian Pear Asparagus
Avocado Beets
Broccoli Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage Carrots
Cauliflower Celery
Chard Cherimoyas
Collards Corn
Cucumber Dates
Eggplant Figs
Grapes Grapefruit
Green Beans Ginger
Guava Kale
Kiwi Kohlrabi
Leeks Lemons
Mushrooms Mustard Greens
Okra Onions
Ranges Passion Fruit
Peppers Persimmons
Pineapple Pomegranates
Potatoes Raspberries
Sapote Spinach
Squash-Summer and Winter varieties Tomatillos
Turnips Yams

Flu Season

8 Oct

Fall has arrived and with it comes cold and flu season. We all have certain ways to help cure ourselves when we are sick. It can be anything from a specific kind of cough drop, soup, or tea  to something your mom used to do or make for you as a kid. In addition to those things I have this home remedy. I make it whenever I feel that icky tickle in my throat.

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8oz Warm Water
1 tablespoon Apple Cider Vinegar
1 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper
1 small Lemon, juiced
4 drops Oil of Oregano
1 tablespoon Honey (optional-I only add this if my throat is in terrible pain)

Why this combination?

-Apple cider vinegar promotes nasal drainage and soothes a sore throat.

-Cayenne pepper has anti inflammatory properties, helps to clear congestion, and contains vitamin A.

-Lemon juice also soothes a sore throat and contains vitamin C.

-Oil of oregano has antibacterial properties and contains zinc, magnesium, iron, calcium, potassium, manganese, niacin, vitamin C, and vitamin E.

-Honey is known to be antimicrobial and soothes a sore throat.

Try this the next time you feel that tickle in your throat and let me know what you think.

STAY MINDFUL OF COVERING YOUR MOUTH AND WASHING YOUR HANDS TO KEEP GERMS FROM SPREADING.

MOST IMPORTANTLY STAY WELL!!